Everything you need to know about ECZEMA(understand it,don’t continue scratching )

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Eczema is an umbrella term used to describe a group of medical conditions that cause red, inflamed and itchy skin.

Different stages and types of eczema affect 31.6 percent of people in the United States.

The word “eczema” is also used specifically to talk about atopic dermatitis, the most common type of eczema.

“Atopic” refers to a collection of diseases involving the immune system, including atopic dermatitis, asthma, and hay fever. Dermatitis is an inflammation of the skin.

Some people outgrow the condition, while others will continue to have it throughout adulthood.

There are eight types of eczema

Atopic dermatitisatitis – a result of skin touching a known irritant and/or allergen.

Dyshidrotic eczema – occurs on the feet and hands as itchy blisters, usually caused by exposure to allergens.

Hand eczema – caused by a combination of genes, irritants and/or allergens.

Lichen simplex chronicus – results in thick, scaly patches on the skin, often caused by too much scratching and rubbing.

Nummular eczema/discoid eczema/nummular dermatitis – usually caused by allergens or very dry skin and appears as round lesions that can weep fluid, especially in older populations.

Seborrheic dermatitis – white or yellow flaky, greasy patches in places with more oil-producing glands, caused by a combination of genetics, hormones and microorganisms on the skin.

Stasis dermatitis – happens when poor circulation to the legs causes the veins to swell and leak fluid, causing swelling and skin redness and itch, mostly in older populations.

People with one type of eczema may also go on to develop other types depending on genetics and exposure to environmental triggers.

 

Causes

Pollen is one of the many potential triggers of eczema.

The specific cause of eczema remains unknown, but it is believed to develop due to a combination of genetic and environmental factors.

Eczema is not contagious.

Children are more likely to develop eczema if a parent has had the condition or another atopic disease.

If both parents have an atopic disease, the risk is even greater.

Environmental factors are also known to bring out the symptoms of eczema, such as:

  • Irritants: These include soaps, detergents, shampoos, disinfectants, juices from fresh fruits, meats, or vegetables.
  • Allergens: Dust mites, pets, pollens, mold, and dandruff can lead to eczema.
  • Microbes: These include bacteria such as Staphylococcus aureus, viruses, and certain fungi.
  • Hot and cold temperatures: Very hot or cold weather, high and low humidity, and perspiration from exercise can bring out eczema.
  • Foods: Dairy products, eggs, nuts and seeds, soy products, and wheat can cause eczema flare-ups.
  • Stress: This is not a direct cause of eczema but can make symptoms worse.
  • Hormones: Women can experience increased eczema symptoms at times when their hormone levels are changing, for example during pregnancy and at certain points in the menstrual cycle.

 

 

Medications

 

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